Tag Archives: beginner project

A new summer outfit – it couldn’t be easier!

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the HedgerowThese days I am still mainly existing under a pile of fabric and patterns from our blogger’s #parissewsocial trip to Paris.  This combination of fabrics immediately jumped out of the pile at me so I knew it had to be my first make.  In fact, I was able to make TWO outfits from these two fabrics – more on that later.

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the Hedgerow

For the first ensemble I wanted something quick and simple for two reasons (and one of them is NOT just because I’m lazy! 😉 ).

  • First, I was so anxious to see these fabrics on Margot that I couldn’t be spending days making something elaborate.
  • Second, the fabrics are so gorgeous as they are that I didn’t think they needed too much messing around with.

…or maybe I’m just lazy!

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the Hedgerow

OK, where shall we start.  Everyone loves a Liberty print…

The Skirt

This Liberty of London fabric is one of my all-time favourites.  It’s called Mitsi in nougat and was a generous gift from the online fabric shop Cousette.  It’s beautiful and understated yet still has a bit of pazazz in the form of the sparkly gold dots in the centre of the flowers.  This same fabric was given to all the #parissewsocial bloggers so keep your eyes open and I’m sure you’ll see some beautiful creations popping up.

Liberty of London // Behind the Hedgerow

Cousette not only stocks Liberty of London (new season as well as vintage) but also a large selection of Petit Pan, Atelier Brunette, Nani Iro, and Kokka, amongst others.  If you’re looking for fabric inspiration then look no further!

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the Hedgerow

The skirt itself is as simple as can be – basically one large rectangle sewed into a circle with french seams and then gathered and attached to the neon elastic waistband (bought years ago at Purl Soho).  I loosely followed this tutorial on Purl Bee.

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the Hedgerow

For the hem I finally got around to doing a rolled hem on my serger.  Well, that was easy – not sure why I put that off for so long.

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the HedgerowI’m pretty sure Margot will live in this skirt this summer – so light and breezy and easy to throw on!

The (Un)Twisted Tank

This mustard jersey was also a gift – this time from the Finnish online shop, Nosh.  Nosh is new to me but I can’t tell you how excited I am to order some more of their amazing organic jerseys.  They sell ready-to-wear clothes as well – for those times when sewing something yourself just isn’t going to happen!  As you’d expect from anything Scandinavian, the aesthetic is minimal, oh-so chic with a splash of playfulness.  Seriously, who could resist these tigers?!

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the Hedgerow

The pattern for this tank is the Twisted Tank by Laura of Titchy Threads.  I have always loved Laura’s patterns, both for their design and instructions.  I will be sharing more about the Twisted Tank (and Laura’s new Twisted Trousers pattern) next week as part of the Twisted Tuesdays Tour so will save all the details until then.  For now, just know that this little tank is the perfect summer garment for boys and girls!  It’s a quick sew but, even with something so simple, Laura manages to teach a few tricks along the way – and I just love the fit!  Love the fit!!

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the Hedgerow

Like I’ve already said, I love this combination of fabrics.  Check back in the coming days to see another creation…

Thanks for reading – hope you’re all enjoying sunshine, sewing, and…climbing trees!

Laura x

Liberty skirt and mustard Twisted Tank // Behind the Hedgerow

 

Liesl and Co’s Woodland Stroll Cape [Minerva Craft Blogger Network]

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the Hedgerow

Liesl and Co Woodland Stroll Cape

Make this pattern if:  you want a high-impact, low-effort staple for autumn.

Don’t make this pattern if:  you’re in denial that summer is coming to an end.

For this month’s Minerva Craft Blogger Network I’ve taken the opportunity to get ready for autumn.  Yes, the sun is still shining – and we have yet to even go on our summer holiday – but I couldn’t resist the combination of boiled wool and cotton lawn in a simple, stylish cape.

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the Hedgerow

More specifically, my inspiration for this Liesl + Co Woodland Stroll Cape came from two places:

kcw-winter-2014-olivers-cape-front-2

Today’s post is going to be heavy on the photos, light on the words.  You can read a full review of this pattern here.  You’ll see that I love the pattern for little girls and now I can safely say I love it for adults as well!

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the HedgerowThe fabric choice for this cape make it really special.  This was my first time sewing with boiled wool but definitely not the last!  It’s easy to sew with, doesn’t fray, and gives a sleek professional look.  I wasn’t sure about pre-washing and, after some internet reading, decided against pre-washing at all – I imagine I will get the cape dry cleaned when the time comes.

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the Hedgerow

The lining is a gorgeous peacock feather lawn from Minerva.  It’s got the cool, slipperiness of Liberty and works perfectly for a cape that slides on and off easily.

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the Hedgerow

As with most Liesl+Co and Oliver+s patterns, this one came together without any hitches and Liesl offers up some great tips and tricks to get a really professional finish.  This really is an easy project and, being an outerwear garment, has maximum impact.

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the Hedgerow

The only additional construction tip I can add is to consider using a walking foot if you have one.  I started without one but there was a fair amount of shifting between the wool and the lawn but the walking foot kept everything together nicely.

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the Hedgerow

 

The vast majority of the time I’m sure I’ll be wearing this cape over jeans and a long-sleeved t-shirt, however I think it would be elegant and sophisticated over a dress for a night out.  In other words, it’s a truly versatile piece.  Not bad for only three pattern pieces and an afternoon of sewing!

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the Hedgerow

I highly recommend this pattern and fabric to help kick-start your wardrobe into autumn!  You can find the kit with all the fabric and notions here.  You can instantly download the pattern here.

And, as with all good photo shoots, it ends with some of your favourite people photo bombing it!

Woodland Stroll Cape by Liesl and Co // Behind the Hedgerow

Thanks for reading and here’s hoping you feel inspired to get your autumn wardrobe started!

Laura x

 

 

 

An easy breezy summer top you’ll never want to take off

Shearwater Kaftan by Make It Perfect // Behind the HedgerowMake this pattern if: you want an easy-to-sew, easy-to-wear top that will take you nicely from summer into autumn.

Don’t make this pattern if: you’re looking for something with precise tailoring and structure.

My only regret with this top is that I didn’t make it earlier in the summer in order to get more wear out of it.  The style and fit make it so easy to wear and the double gauze with slightly metallic dots gives it a touch of luxury that’s always welcome for something that’s so effortless to wear.

Shearwater Kaftan by Make It Perfect // Behind the Hedgerow

The Pattern

With a pattern company name like Make It Perfect, Toni really has given herself a lot to live up to!  This is my first project from Toni’s patterns but I have been an admirer for a while.  Her A+ Skirt even made it into one of my Top Ten lists.  When I received the pattern in the post I admit to being a teeny bit disappointed when I saw that the pattern pieces still needed to be traced and cut (I’ve been doing lots of printing, taping and cutting of patterns as of late).  But fear not, there are only four large pattern sheets to deal with and it wasn’t nearly as painful as I imagined.

After discussing the fit with others who had made this pattern I decided to make a size medium even though my measurements fell in the small category.  Perhaps the small would have worked too but I like the easy comfort of my version.

Shearwater Kaftan by Make It Perfect // Behind the Hedgerow

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s just a pair of frisky wood pigeons doing a mating display!

 The Fabric

Ooooh, the fabric!  Rachael (imagine gnats) kindly gifted me this fabric and all I can say is that I wish I had a whole bolt of it!  The colour is olive and those dots have a slight metallic sheen to them.  This exact fabric is no longer available in her shop but I would quite happily make and wear versions in this (for a subtle sophisticated look), this (for a burst of colour) or this (if you’re feeling a little outrageous).  Double gauze is easy to work with and is great for anything that will end up directly on the skin – like these baby comfort blankets and these three quilts.

The little bursts of red are from some leftover baby-cord that I used to make this red riding cape.

Shearwater Kaftan by Make It Perfect // Behind the Hedgerow

The Construction

This top is a straightforward sew and I’d say suitable for an ambitious beginner.  You do have to make your own bias tape (really not that hard, just a bit time-consuming) but you could always use ready-made if you prefer (I think making your own in the same fabric as the top gives a more professional finish but, hey!, that’s just me).

Shearwater Kaftan by Make It Perfect // Behind the Hedgerow

A couple of other tips/observations/alterations:

  • Since the inside seam can be seen when you roll up the sleeves I did French seams.  The only downside of this was that I wasn’t able to do the side vents.

Shearwater Kaftan by Make It Perfect // Behind the Hedgerow

  • The sleeves are a great feature.  They can be worn long or rolled up and buttoned in place.  In case you’re in any doubt about how to do the sleeve roll, it goes something like this 😉

Shearwater Kaftan by Make It Perfect // Behind the Hedgerow

  • The neckline.  I would advise you to consider the length of the placket you want to use carefully before cutting (you have a long and a short option.  Long = a deep V; Short = a not-so-deep V).  I assumed I would want the long version but found it was much too low for wearing the top without anything underneath.  To fix this for the final version I did three things:
  1. I cut the short option from the pattern (duh!).
  2. I added interfacing to the placket to give it a bit more structure (it still flops open but I’ve decided I like it this way).
  3. I extended the bias binding that goes around the neck in order to make ties that can be closed (for those days I’m feeling more modest 😉 ).  Abby did something similar in her beautiful version.

Shearwater Kaftan by Make It Perfect // Behind the HedgerowSo, “what’s the result?” I hear you asking.  Did Toni in fact Make It Perfect?  Well, for this style of top, with this fabric, for my lifestyle, I’d say that it’s a resounding YES!  If I haven’t done enough to convince you to give these patterns a go then check out what everyone else on the parade has been up to.

The Make It Perfect Pattern Parade Virtual Catwalk introduces…

 

A huge thank you to Toni for having me.  It’s been great!  And thanks to you for reading.

Laura x

Sew a summer skirt 101 [Minerva Craft Blogger Network]

Simplicity-1616-front-looking-down

Sometimes I wonder exactly who you are.  Yes, you!  Perhaps you’re all seasoned sewists who check in on me now and again in an “awww, isn’t she cute trying to sew” kind of way; or maybe you’re absolute beginners looking for a little guidance from a fellow sewing enthusiast (and I sincerely hope there’s a lovely mix of both types out there).

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

Whatever your level or background, we all love a simple skirt, right?!  Well, that is exactly what I have to share with you this month for the Minerva Craft Blogger Network.

The Pattern

The pattern is Simplicity 1616.  Yes, it’s as basic as they come but it’s also an incredibly useful staple.  It has versions for both knit and woven fabric and, especially if you’re new to sewing, it walks you through the (very few) steps to create the skirt – sew side seams, sew on waistband, hem, DONE!  It really is that easy!  I made this skirt in way under an hour and still had time and fabric left to make a matching one for Margot.

The waistband is a fold-over yoga-style which means you can throw this baby on in a seconds flat…and it’s ridiculously comfortable!

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

The Fabric

If you’re going to make something as simple as this then it’s important to consider the fabric carefully.  A basic solid colour skirt would be acceptable but this techno-bright digital floral graphic is waaaay more fun, I think you’ll agree!

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

This is a heavy(ish) weight polyester/spandex jersey fabric.  The print is fun and vivid, the feel is slippery yet weighty and it’s listed on the Minerva Craft site as Scuba bodycon – which I found somewhat scary and slightly intimidating.  I had to double-check with Minerva to make sure it would be suitable for a simple skirt.

It turns out it’s perfect for this skirt.  I made view A but shortened it by 15 inches.  For Margot’s skirt I used the skirt part of the pattern from Kitschy Coo’s Skater Dress and drafted a waistband based on her measurements.  Again, easy as pie – and one happy girl!

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

One word to the wise, especially if using this fabric for children’s clothes, it will pick quite easily so, if such things bother you, take care.

I’ve crossed a line

This innocuous little project has also seen me cross a sewing line that I thought would never happen – matching mother/daughter clothes!  I cringe even when I type out the words!  What have I done!?

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

Well, if I’m totally honest I can’t say I’m that surprised.  Ever since I’ve seen Trine (Groovybaby…and Mama) sew up some fabulous ensembles for her and her daughter I knew that matching clothes could now officially be classed as cool and acceptable (at least in my world of what’s ‘official’ and what’s ‘cool’).  What about you?!  Are you rushing out to buy bolts of fabric destined for matching outfits or are you currently un-subscribing to this blog with the mere suggestion of such a fashion faux-pas?

Sum up

These things are true:

  • Summer is around the corner (at least for us Northern Hemispherers)
  • Time is always the most valuable commodity
  • Swishy skirts add fun and frivolity to life
  • If you have a daughter, you can now be twins!

Do you need any more persuading!  It’ll be the best 45 minutes you’ve ever spent sewing something so simple!

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

Thanks for reading,

Laura x

PS – Have you noticed some changes around the blog?!  I have now moved from wordpress.com to wordpress.org!  Way-hey!  There will be more changes in the coming days and I’m working on my own little giveaway as well!  Stay tuned and in the meantime feel free to have a fresh look around.

 

Perfect Pattern Parcel #2 – Figgy’s Celestial Tee

 

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

Have you heard about the new and innovative way of selling modern sewing patterns?  It’s called Perfect Pattern Parcel and, in short, it’s a bundle of sewing patterns from independent designers that are available for a limited time on a semi-regular basis.  What makes it unique is the way they are sold – you choose the price you want to pay and how that money is divided between the organisers, the designers and a charity supporting children’s education.  You can read all about the initiative and purchase your parcel (available until 18th April) here.

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

This is the second bundle of patterns that’s been released and it’s centred around staples for a girl’s wardrobe.  It includes five patterns and really is a stylish and versatile collection – I can’t wait to sew them all.

Celestial Tee by Figgy’s

September Tunic and Dress by Too Sweets Patterns

The Caroline Party Dress by Mouse House Creations

Hanami Top and Dress by Straightgrain

Hosh Pants by LouBee Clothing

For this post I sewed a version of Figgy’s celestial tee.  I had a small amount of Liberty jersey leftover from this dress and I was determined to turn this into a tee.  I had to get a little creative with the pattern pieces to make it all work but, in the end, I’m happy with the look.

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

This pattern is a great staple and very easy to whip up (the sleeves are integrated so you don’t even have to fuss with setting them in).  I made a size 4/5 for my 6 year-old and you can see that it is a bit on the small side (but there is always something irresistible about little tummies poking out under shirts!).

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

My only other comment about this pattern is the method or attaching the neckline.  I’m used to dividing out the stretch of the neckline piece evenly around the whole tee before sewing.  Here Shelly instructs you to attach it without pinning and just stretch is gently as you sew.  This is by far the quickest method but you need to be careful about how much you stretch that neckline piece – too much and you’ll end up with a tiny, distorted neckline; too little and you’ll have a big gaping neck.  I did mine slightly too loose and actually pulled it all out and started again.

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

So there you have a quick, easy tee for the coming warmer months.  Everyone needs t-shirts, right?  You can even cut up some old adult sized t-shirts to make something new and wonderful for your little girl.  And let’s not forget that is it Kid’s Clothes Week so you really have no excuse to not get sewing!

Thanks for reading,

Laura x

It’s Spring – time to get outside! {A Mailbox Surprise creation}

Bias-trimmed gardening apron // Behind the HedgerowToday I’m guest posting at Compagnie M. as part of the Mailbox Surprise Series.  This series has seen fabric parcels being sent to talented sewing bloggers all over the world to be used to make wonderful creations for the little people in our lives.

I sent Ana Sofia (S is for Sewing) this parcel back in December…

…which she then turned into this:

Pretty fun, right?  (And pretty cute – well, just plain pretty!).  Today it’s my turn to share the creation I made using fabric sent to me by Suz (Sewpony).

Bias-trimmed gardening apron // Behind the Hedgerow

I’ve enjoyed this whole project because:

  • The sun is out!!!!!  Can you see the light shining on the apron at the top!!  I haven’t seen the sun in months!
  • The photo shoot did NOT take place in front of my white brick wall!!  Shock, I know!  So, where did we venture?  Click over to Compagnie M. to find out!
  • The photo shoot required exactly ZERO bribes and no tears were shed.

You can read all the details and see many more photos over at Compagnie M.  I think every girl deserves an apron to get mucky in!

Bias-trimmed gardening apron // Behind the HedgerowThanks for reading!  I have something BIG to share on Monday so please stop by!

Laura x

{Top 10 for Tuesday} If you like Lisette’s Portfolio Dress pattern then you’ll love…

Top 10 for Tuesday - Patterns similar to Lisette Portfolio (Simplicity 2245) // Behind the HedgerowThe most common ‘general enquiry’ email I get through my blog is asking about the pattern I used to make the dress I’m wearing in my profile picture.  It’s Lisette’s Portfolio Dress (Simplicity 2245) and is now *sadly* out of print (or is it?!?!, keep reading!).

But fear not!  Wipe your tears away and check out these other sewing patterns that I’ve compiled that might also take your fancy.

10.  New Look 6145

On close inspection, this is a cute little dress!  It’s got lots of interesting options – I particularly like the pleated (?) sleeves in view A and the wide collar on views C, D, and E.

Here’s a great real life version by Kathryn of Elevenses with Mrs L.

9.  Schoolhouse Tunic – Sew Liberated

I’ve had this pattern on my to-sew list for longer than I care to admit.

There are lots of cute versions out there.  I like this yellow one for Spring by Shannon of 2nd Story Sewing.

8.  Tessuti Gabby Dress

There seems to be a lot of chatter out there right now about Tessuti.  If I’m honest, they haven’t been on my radar until now but so far I really like what I see.  This dress looks like the perfect beginner project – easy enough to complete without tears or swearing yet challenging enough to really feel like you’ve accomplished something.

I adore this fabric choice by Sewn by Elizabeth.

And here’s a fabulous, self-proclaimed kooky version by Smunch.

7.  Relaxed Fit Shift Dress – Pattern Runway

A pattern by Australian-based independent design company Pattern Runway.

6. The Laurel Dress – Colette Patterns

A simple and beautifully designed dress with loads of room for personalisation.

How can you not fall in love with this version by Sew Convert?!

And Sew Charleston shows us how it can work with a belt.

5.  Front Pleat Dress BurdaStyle 07/2012 #104

I do like this dress but wonder if it would just be totally shapeless with the extra fabric due to the pleat.  Here’s how it looks on the pattern.  Thoughts?

Here’s a top version of the same pattern again, by Lauren of Smunch (can you see I have a new blogger’s crush?!).

4.  Linen Shift Dress – a free tutorial

I love linen – it makes everything look casually chic.  This is quite a nifty little tutorial for making up a dress in a couple of hours.  I’ve got some lovely, soft navy linen in my stash…

3.  Simplicity 2147

As with so many pattern envelopes, this one does not inspire…

…but these two versions surely do!  I would happily wear either of these every day of the week!  The colouring and styling by Simple Beans is right up my alley.

And I love the gingham cut on the bias here by Barefoot in the Kitchen.

2.  Built by Wendy – Simplicity 3835

One of the key features of the Portfolio Dress is the integrated pockets.  It’s hard to find other patterns that have this construction but this dress has lots of scope for adding your own.

Sanae’s version applies welt pockets which get really close to the overall look of the Portfolio.

This version by The Fabled Needle applies vintage utility-looking pockets to great effect.

1.  The Factory Dress – Merchant and Mills

No surprise that I’d have a Merchant and Mills dress at the top of the list!  In fact, I have this pattern and fabric which I purchased on a recent visit to the Merchant and Mills shop in Rye, UK.  Watch this space for my own version!

I love all of Harmony & Rosie’s makes – this dress is no exception.

——————————-

If you want to see all the possibilities for inclusion in this post then check out my pinterest board all about shift dresses.

So, what do you think?  Do any of these patterns make you *less* sad that the Portfolio is out of print??  NO???  Well then, how about this:

THE PORTFOLIO DRESS IS BEING RE-RELEASED!!

Yup, that’s right!  I got in touch with Liesl before writing this post and she informed me that they’re just putting the finishing touches on the newly updated pattern (it will be released under Liesl&Co as opposed to Simplicity).  She tells that this version is going to be *even better* than the original!  Great news, right?  And, it gets better.  Liesl has very generously agreed to offer a copy of the new pattern to one of you lovely readers!  Once the pattern is released I’ll be hosting a giveaway so keep your eyes open.

Until that release date, which of these 10 has you rushing to your sewing area to get started!?

Thanks for reading,

Laura x

The Ethereal Dress – Figgy’s Heavenly Tour and GIVEAWAY

Figgy's patterns - Ethereal dress // Behind the Hedgerow

I owe a lot to Shelly of Figgy’s Patterns.  It was with the help of her patterns that I, as an incredibly inexperienced yet overly enthusiastic sewist, learned to sew.  So, unsurprisingly, when Shelly asked me to join the pattern tour I not only agreed with said enthusiasm but I also achieved one of my own personal sewing goals – to use my creations to inspire a wider audience of home sewists.

Figgy's patterns - Ethereal dress // Behind the Hedgerow

With the full array of the Heavenly Bundle to choose from, the most difficult part of this make was settling on just one!  I knew I wanted to use this fabric* – for me, the night sky, the flecks of gold sparkle and the colour palette all encapsulate the celestial, heavenly, ethereal vibe of this pattern collection.  Folks, I had to stop myself from super-imposing a celestial sky as a background to my title image….or maybe I couldn’t manage to resist!?   Keep scrolling….

Figgy's patterns - Ethereal dress // Behind the Hedgerow

The dress is simple in its conception yet genius in its construction.

Conception

The pattern itself consists of a fully lined bodice, gathered skirt, with or without sleeves and a beautiful, dare I say ethereal ruffle.  There are four lengths to choose from and the back closure is a single button.  I made the simplest version – sleeveless with no ruffle/frill.  It was a tough decision to leave off this frill as it really is the signature part of the dress, but I felt that in order to do this fabric justice I had to leave it as unadorned as possible.  Maybe you’d disagree?  Do you think a frill would have worked?  (And in case you haven’t been following along in the tour – Cherie did a fantastic version which showcased the frill perfectly).

Like others have mentioned, these patterns tend to fall on the large side so I made a size 4/5 with the 6/7 length for my 6-year-old daughter.  I am very happy with the fit.

Figgy's patterns - Ethereal dress // Behind the Hedgerow

Construction

This project is fairly straightforward.  Shelly shows you a great way to sew the bodice and the bodice lining together but, I admit, I was stumped to begin with!  It was one of those occasions where I had to read and re-read the instructions something like 25 times before the penny dropped….and then I had one of those lovely ‘Ohhhh, now I get it!’ moments.  I have since come across Shelly doing a mini-tutorial for this stage of the construction so if you’re struggling then this will make everything clear.

Other than that it was smooth sailing.  I had to modify the skirt slightly as my fabric wasn’t wide enough to get the two pieces where I needed them – I essentially just cut one large rectangle the full width of the fabric.  I did the little trick with dental floss for the gathering – makes it so smooth and quick.

Figgy's patterns - Ethereal dress // Behind the Hedgerow

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*  The fabric is Yokohama Forest by Alexander Henry and I bought it at de Stoffenkamer in Gent, Belgium.  It looks as if they’re out of stock but you can also get it from Hawthorne Threads.

———————

So, have I sold you on this pattern?  I hope so, because if you leave a comment below then you’ll be entered to win a Figgy’s Heavenly Collection Pattern of your choice!  If you’re also into other social media outlets then I’d love for you to follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and/or Pinterest.  You’ll be entered once for each one you follow (and if you already follow any of them just say so in your comment) – so that’s a total of FIVE TIMES you can enter to win!

Figgy's patterns - Ethereal dress // Behind the Hedgerow

Casting spells to turn sheep into a statue…

And if that’s not enough you can also hop over to Figgy’s blog to enter to win the GRAND PRIZE which consists of:

Fiskars Fabric Shears, Detail Scissors, Rotary Cutter and Extra Blades

Bernina Rolled Hem Foot & Buttonhole Cutter

$25 Gift Certifcate from Girl Charlee

A stack of gorgeous Fat Quarters from Alison Glass 

Beautiful Eyelet yardage from Michael Miller

A lovely stack of Fat Quarters from Art Gallery Fabric

 Susan Beal’s new book “Easy Embellishment”

The Heavenly Bundle Collection from Figgy’s

So, what are you waiting for?  Get entering then get sewing!!  Have you made any of Figgy’s Heavenly Collection yet?  What do you think of them?

Figgy's patterns - Ethereal dress // Behind the Hedgerow

And in case you’ve missed any of the fun you can check out any of the blogs below to see more (bear in mind not all of them have posted yet).  Or, check out Shelly’s Pinterest page devoted to Figgy’s About Town.

Thanks for reading,

Laura x

Oh, did you think I forgot?!  Here is my experiment with Photoshop YouTube tutorials!  It’s kind of a train wreck but I just couldn’t help myself (not quite sure why I included the sheep – I guess just because I could!).  Go on, you know you want to pin it! 😉

Figgy's patterns - Ethereal dress // Behind the Hedgerow




Oliver+s Forest Path Cape – KCW Winter 2014 – Day Five

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

Day five?!  Where did day four go??  This week of Kid’s Clothes Week, winter 2014 is speeding along like no other.  I write to you this evening from a very cosy B&B in the heart of the Kent countryside.  I’m with a very snuggly 6-year-old on a quest to find our perfect home.  Today’s viewing of a 15th century Grade I listed farmhouse wasn’t bad!

Amongst the last-minute upheaval, sewing still seems to be getting done!  Today’s project is Oliver+s’s Forest Path Cape.  Wow folks – this one is a WINNER!

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

What did you make?

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

The Oliver+s Forest Path Cape is a digital pattern for downloading and printing at home.  I usually despise this process but this one has minimal pieces and, since it’s for a kid, it’s not too large.  The pattern is rated ‘one scissor’ by Oliver+s and , let me tell you, I can’t remember the last time I had such an easy pattern make such a big impact.

Size and fabric?

I made a size 6 which is perfect.

The fabric is one of the best parts of this make.  The outside is the softest, most touchable wool/polyester mix from Minerva Crafts.  This fabric would make a fantastic winter coat and, with the chevrons, the whole look is interesting yet remains neutral.  Next year I’d like to push myself and try to make this coat or this one.

Although the pattern recommends a lovely, soft, slippery lining fabric, I went for a fuzzy neutral flannel for added warmth.  This undoubtedly makes the whole sewing process easier as well since both fabrics were happy to stay put while sewing.

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

Did you enjoy making it?

This project really is a breeze!  If you’re new to sewing and just figuring it all out then please start your sewing adventure here!  This pattern will not disappoint!  Plus, I feel that by sewing outerwear you get more bang for your buck – it’s on show more and therefore there are more opportunities for everyone to see and admire your awesome sewing skillz.

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

Favourite part of finished garment?

The overall shape of the cape is perfect – easy to throw on but with enough shaping that I think of it more as a cardigan than a cape.  Also, you can take this pattern in so many directions with your choice of fabric and buttons (I had to restrain myself to keep it neutral).

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

The part that made you swear the most?

No swearing took place – just some general frustration with my machine and buttonholes.  When I sew buttonholes with different threads on top and bottom they always end up looking like this – with the dark coloured thread showing through to the light side.

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

I’m wondering if this just a fact of sewing buttonholes or a quirk of my particular machine.  Thoughts??

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

Music you were listening to?

Have you guys heard of Cats on Trees – a French musical duo from Toulouse??  I’m loving their song Sirens Call.

Sum them up in 10 words or less?

Easy to sew, easy to wear (just a bit of a pain when layering under a coat).  Sorry – more than 10 words…

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

Would you make them again?  What would you do differently?

I will surely be making this pattern again.  The best part about it is that there’s an adult version of the pattern available as well!  And, guess what?  I have enough of the same fabric to make one for myself.  Matching mother and daughter here we come!

Happy Friday and, of course, happy sewing!

Thanks for reading.

Laura x

Oliver+s cape // Behind the Hedgerow

Meridian Cardigan Pattern Tour and Giveaway – KCW Winter 2014 – Day Two

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

Whew – that’s a long title!  Today is the second day of Kid’s Clothes Week, winter 2014 but it’s also the day I’m participating in the imagine gnats pattern tour…and with every good pattern tour comes a GIVEAWAY!

Rachael, the one-woman whirlwind behind imagine gnats, is an independent pattern designer who makes perfectly stylish and comfortable clothes for children as well as women (and she even has an embroidery pattern).  I’ve made the Bess Top (which I love!) so for this tour I decided to try something for one of the little people in my life.

Here I present you with the Child’s Meridian Cardigan.

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

In case you’re interested, the trousers are Zonen 09’s Jacob pattern which you can read all about here.

If you were reading yesterday you’ll know that I’m keeping these posts short and sweet so as to maximise the time in front of my sewing machine.  I’ve asked myself a few questions that you can quickly read through before hopping over to another fantastic blog with more inspiring kid’s clothes!

What did you make?

Imagine gnats’ Meridian Cardigan – child version.  This is a downloadable PDF pattern with clear instructions and useful illustrations.  It’s made with knit/jersey fabric and there are instructions to make it a cardigan (like I did) or a jacket with a collar.  Rachael gives lots of options for button/snap placement.

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

Size and fabric?

Unsurprisingly, I made a size 6 for my 6-year-old.  Her measurements were on the small side for this pattern and I think I could have got away with a size 5.  There is definitely lots of growing room here and, as you can see, the cut is quite generous.  She loves it though – more delicious fabric to wrap herself in!

This cardigan is reversible – did I mention that?! – reversible!  The solid side is a lush aubergine jersey from Minerva crafts.  The fabulous floral knit is from de Stoffenkamer in Gent.  I adore the colour palette of this fabric and my only regret with this make is that my daughter gets to be covered in beautiful flowers and not me!

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

Did you enjoy making them?

Yes, I did actually.  It’s very easy and would be a great project for someone new to sewing with knits.  The sleeves are raglan so there’s nothing to set and there are no exposed seams (once you sew the two sides together you turn it right side out through one of the sleeves).  I was enjoying the process so much that I even took the time to hand stitch the sleeve cuffs together!

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

Favourite part of finished garment?

I love the easy style of this cardigan.  The double layer of fabric gives it a nice weight and it’s easy to throw on and off in these cold months of layering many garments.  Margot likes the swishy-ness of it.

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

The part that made you swear the most?

I actually don’t think I swore once making this!  That’s gotta be a good sign.  My top-stitching all the way around went a little wonky but I’m still glad I did it because it keeps the layers together nicely.

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

Music you were listening to?

Still listening to Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros.  Saw them in concert last night here in Belgium and it was phenomenal!  Great music to sew by!

Sum them up in 10 words or less?

great beginner project for knits, perfect for layering.

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

Would you make it again?  What would you do differently?

Yes!  This would make a great gift as well since you don’t need to know exact sizes and you really can knock this out in one sitting.

Next time I’ll give more thought to the button placement.  At the moment I haven’t added any buttons – I want to see how Margot wears it and what makes most sense in terms of closures.  As we all know, buttonholes are so final and I don’t want to get the placement wrong!

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

Fed up of photos – wants to watch Harry Potter

GIVEAWAY

Have you made any imagine gnats patterns yet?  Would you like to try one?  Leave a comment on this post and your name will be entered to win one of Rachael’s patterns.  You can see the whole collection here.  The deadline is midnight on Saturday, 1 February (Central European Time).

Meridian Cardigan (imagine gnats) // Behind the Hedgerow

Thanks for reading and good luck with all your sewing this week!

Laura x