Tag Archives: knit

Liberty and Mustard – version 2

Japanese LIberty top and mustard leggings // Behind the HedgerowI told you l liked this fabric combination!  A couple of weeks ago I shared this outfit which combined this muted yet elegant Liberty of London called Mitsi in nougat (which was a generous gift from the online fabric shop Cousette) with some organic mustard jersey from Nosh.

Japanese LIberty top and mustard leggings // Behind the Hedgerow

But I didn’t stop at just one outfit.  Here is the second instalment – a top made from this Japanese sewing book.

In fact, it’s this top here on the left.

And leggings from the Go To Leggings pattern by Go To Patterns.

 

Pin-Tucked Blouse

I’ve made a few things from Japanese patterns before and, even though they can sometimes be a labour of love, I have always liked the end result.  I’ve got three new Japanese sewing books in my collection so thought it was time to crack on and get something sewn up.  These are the other two books I picked up in Japantown in San Francisco – I think I’ll make something for ME next!

… Finally decided on these two. #japanesesewingpatterns

A post shared by Laura Fisher (@behindhedgerow) on

Japanese LIberty top and mustard leggings // Behind the Hedgerow

This book was gift from Tuttle publishing as part of the Blogger’s Paris Meet Up #parissewsocial, back in April.  I chose to sew this pattern because I wanted something light and floaty that would work well with the Tana Lawn and I also needed to be careful with fabric quantity.  I only had a total of one metre of this Liberty and after making this skirt I didn’t have too much to work with.  I just about managed to cut out the pattern pieces (and that was after cutting one of the sleeves incorrectly!).

Japanese LIberty top and mustard leggings // Behind the Hedgerow

As is customary with Japanese sewing patterns, the written instructions were minimal with only illustrations to help you along.  With a simple blouse like this I didn’t think this would be a problem, however, this project was not without its complications.

  • The biggest issue I had was with the sizing.  I made the size 6 for my 7-year-old.  Of course the fit is meant to be loose and easy but the neckline ended up being way too big and sloppy.  Here it is before alteration.

Japanese LIberty top and mustard leggings // Behind the Hedgerow

  • The whole blouse (including the neckline facing) was finished by the time I made this realisation so I wasn’t sure what to do.  I ended up unpicking part of the back neckline facing and making a big inverted pleat in the back to bring the whole neckline in.  It’s not the perfect solution because if effects the fit around the arms but for something this loose it will work.

Japanese LIberty top and mustard leggings // Behind the Hedgerow

  • Another issue was the order of construction.  It instructs you to attach the sleeves before finishing the neckline in the back.  This would leave you with an exposed raw edge where the front sleeve seam meets the neckline so I had to juggle the order of things.
  • I omitted the elastic sleeve cuff and just did a quick rolled hem on the sleeves.

Japanese LIberty top and mustard leggings // Behind the Hedgerow

I do love the look of all the clothes in this book and I will definitely not be put off by these minor issues.  If you’re interested in reading and seeing more about this book then there are some really stunning garments out there.  I love this dress from Alida Makes.  And I’m pretty sure this dress by Gioia (Dotta) will be the next one I make.

Go To Leggings

There’s not a great deal to say about these leggings.  This is the pattern that I always use for leggings and it’s never let me down.  You can whip these up in no time and I’ve always found the fit spot on.  I made the capri length this time.  In this picture you can really appreciate the knobbly, textured nature of the fabric.  It’s wonderful stuff!

Japanese LIberty top and mustard leggings // Behind the HedgerowSo, that’s two summer outfits to add to the wardrobe.  Not bad for just one metre of each of these fabrics!  I only wish I had more to make the same outfits for myself!

Thanks for reading,

Laura x

 

The Titchy Threads Twisted Tuesday Tour

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

Have you been following the Twisted Tuesdays Tour to mark the launch of the new Titchy Threads patterns?  Laura, the designer behind these fabulous new patterns, has rounded up a brilliant group of bloggers (myself included 😉 ) to help showcase the style and versatility of the Twisted Trousers and Twisted Tank.  We’re into week four right now.  You can catch up with weeks one, two and three here.

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

Twisted Trousers

Fabric

The main fabric for the trousers is some lush navy linen that I’ve had in my stash for ages.  They keep these trousers light and breezy for springtime (although I must stay, I’m a little concerned about how quickly they could have holes in the knees!!).  The contrasting back pockets are Kona Cotton in Pickle (I adore this colour!) from The Village Haberdashery.  The piping I picked up in Belgium and it’s been waiting for the perfect project.  The fact that I had the right amount of piping – down to the last inch!! – is proof to me that it’s the perfect project!  The waistband is some stripey ribbing.

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

Options

I chose to make the non-reversible version with the un-piped back pockets and I omitted the grommets from the waistband.  To be honest, I would have liked to have added them but I chickened out a little bit!  I also thought about adding knee patches (Manu is incredibly hard on his clothes!) but I just wasn’t convinced that I’d like the way they’d look.  Maybe next time.

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

Size

Manu is five and a half and a little on the small side.  Based on his measurements I made a size 4 for the trousers, extending them to size 5 for the length.  [Note: because of the twisted nature of the trousers you can’t just add length to the bottom – pay attention to where the pattern instructs you to lengthen them.]  This wasn’t difficult to do and I’m so glad I did – he’ll get much more wear out of them.

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

Tips, observations, thoughts, insights and what-not

It was no surprise to me that these trousers were a joy to sew.  Laura explains each step in the perfect amount of detail.  She even takes the time to add a ‘cheat sheet’ for those who just want a basic version of instructions – you know, for when you’re making your sixth pair (because this pattern just begs to be made again and again with different features).

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

Much about the pattern has been discussed on this tour so let me just throw my two-cents-worth in there:

  • Pay careful attention to the grainline on the pattern pieces.  Because the trousers are ‘twisted’ the pattern pieces are at odd angles and you really need that grainline marking to keep everything lined up.
  • For the back pockets (I did the version without piping) I used a technique that I learned Figgy’s Banyan Trousers pattern to help get really sharp corners.  1. Take your pocket pattern piece and measure in 2.5cm from the top and 1cm from all the side edges.  2. Fold along those edges.  3. Cut out a cardboard template to this size.  4. Centre this template on your fabric leaving 2.5cm on the top and 1cm around the edges.  5. Double fold the top edge, press and sew.  6. Use your template to press the remaining edges.  This will give you get nice crisp corners.

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

  • Wonder tape.  The pattern suggests that you use wonder tape to hold the back pockets and coin pocket in place before stitching.  This is genius and I’m going to be using this tip for lots of different things.  This means you don’t have to pin the pocket which can often lead to crooked and imperfect sewing.
  • I didn’t have any technical trouble with the pattern.  The only time I struggled a bit was sewing the waistband to the top of the trousers.  I had to be really careful not to trap the elastic that was inside the waistband in the stitching.  So, be careful!

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

 

(Un)Twisted Tank

Fabric

I love this tank!  The viking fabric is a Lillestoff print and it’s just perfect.  This tank really doesn’t use much fabric so I’m hoping to make a few more as gifts.  The orange ribbing was from my stash.

Options

Well, as you can see, my tank’s not twisted!  With this patterned fabric it wouldn’t have worked.  But I’m dying to try the sewing technique to make it twisted – I need more stripes and solid jersey in my life!

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

Size

As with the trousers, I made a size four extending it to size five in the length.  I’m completely happy with the fit.

Tips, observations, thoughts, insights and what-not

Laura’s twisted tank is a clever pattern.  On one level it can be a straight forward go-to pattern for summer tank (like I’ve done here today and also in this version).  Alternatively you can make it more special by incorporating the twisted elements and contrasting pockets.

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

The tank comes together really quickly which is always very satisfying!  And even with a simple pattern like this Laura offers tips that will improve your sewing for future projects – like how to evenly distribute the neckband onto the neckline.  I usually just divide each into quarters and then stretch to fit.  This never works perfectly because you have slightly more fabric on the front of the top than the back (because the neckline dips deeper in the front).  The pattern explains how to get this distributed perfectly.  It’s the little things!  I love ’em!

Manu loves his new outfit!  It’s been a while since I’ve sewn for my boys so it felt great giving him some new duds!  I’ve already got another pair of trousers and a Rowan tee planned for George.  Now all I need to more time!

Happy sewing and thanks for reading,

Laura x

Twisted trousers + tank by Titchy Threads // Behind the Hedgerow

 

The Willow and Co Glamping Tour and GIVEAWAY

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

I am so down with the Willow and Co Glamping Tour!  This whole collection speaks to my soul!  Dramatic much?!  Well, maybe a tad, but my absolute perfect outfit is Wellington boots, tights, a handmade skirt or dress and a chunky cardigan (preferably hand-knitted but I don’t knit).  For me, this just about sums up the concept of glamping – outdoorsy, rustic, and playful; yet beautiful and sophisticated.

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

So, whether you’re talking about the physical act of glamping (glamorous + camping) or about the Willow and Co Glamping Collection of sewing patterns the adjectives apply equally.

All the patterns in the collection seamlessly combine the qualities of function and beauty.

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

When Rebecca (writer of Rock the Stitch blog and designer of the phenomenal Fawn Lily Dress) asked me to join the tour I don’t think I’ve ever said yes so quickly!  It turns out that ‘yes’ was the easy part – the difficulty came in deciding what to sew!

One thing was for sure – my two boys need clothes and they need them NOW! – so I blinkered by vision to only focus on boy items (but I tell you, the Ash Jumpsuit, Aster Cardigan, Clover Shorts, Fawn Lily Dress, and Persimmon Dress were almost impossible to ignore!).

I finally settled on the

HAWTHORN ZIP-UP SWEATSHIRT AND KUDZU SHORTS

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

For the Hawthorn Sweatshirt I made a size 4 (for my 4.5 year old son) with the full zip.  I followed Laura’s impeccable instructions to a T!  This is one of those patterns that you can sit back and relax while making, knowing you are in safe hands.  I have only sewn a zip into jersey one other time and, although not a complete disaster, it did get stretched out so one side was considerably longer than the other and some creative trimming had to be done (the end result is here).

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

A few additions I made:

  • I added wool tartan kangaroo pockets.  My kids are pocket crazy – especially this one!  In fact, you can’t really see it here, but there are actually FOUR pockets!  I had sewn on the seam pockets before deciding to do the kangaroo ones.

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

  • I added elbow patches.  I must say, I was a little afraid of having just a plain grey top to show so I thought these patches would add some interest as well as being practical (and oh-so appropriate of our summer trip to Scotland!).

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

  • For the cuffs and hemming I used a fancy stitch on my machine called something like a feather stitch.  It has the effect of looking a bit like a cover-stitch and also meant I didn’t have to stop and install the twin needle.  This is my new favourite stitch!

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

For the Kudzu Shorts I made a size 5 with a straight leg and I omitted the diagonal seam and cargo pocket. These shorts are hugely versatile, will work equally for boys and girls, and use stretch denim – a fun fabric to sew with!  (I stocked up on about 6 meters of it from Minerva Crafts so you’ll be seeing more of these shorts/trousers in the weeks to come!).

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

Take care when choosing the size for these shorts.  From my son’s measurements it wasn’t clear which size was best so I made a size 4 muslin which was super skin-tight (quite funny and maybe appropriate for Eurovision but not for climbing trees and digging in the dirt!).  For this pair I increased the size to 5 and made the straight (as opposed to skinny) version.  Next time I think I’ll even go up to a size 6.

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

I particularly like the waistband on these shorts.  It’s partially ribbed and partially woven which is something I’ve never done before.  They are quick and easy to get on and off yet still look relatively smart.

Hawthorn Top and Kudzu Shorts // Behind the Hedgerow

Both of these patterns are the perfect summer staples that I know will be worn time and again.

Whether your summer plans take you glamping, camping, surfing or gliding;

hiking, biking, swimming or riding;

The Glamping Collection will give you the power;

to keep your kids looking stylish until summer’s last hour.

Would you like the chance to win one of these patterns AND the fabric to sew it with?!  Just enter below for your chance to win just that – 2 yards of fabric (the same fabric used in the Willow and Co Lookbook) and the pattern of your choice.  Good luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

If you want to see more of the Willow and Co patterns sewn up then check out all the blogs on the tour.

Willow & Co Glamping Tour

Thanks for reading, happy summer sewing and good luck with the giveaway!

Laura x

Sew a summer skirt 101 [Minerva Craft Blogger Network]

Simplicity-1616-front-looking-down

Sometimes I wonder exactly who you are.  Yes, you!  Perhaps you’re all seasoned sewists who check in on me now and again in an “awww, isn’t she cute trying to sew” kind of way; or maybe you’re absolute beginners looking for a little guidance from a fellow sewing enthusiast (and I sincerely hope there’s a lovely mix of both types out there).

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

Whatever your level or background, we all love a simple skirt, right?!  Well, that is exactly what I have to share with you this month for the Minerva Craft Blogger Network.

The Pattern

The pattern is Simplicity 1616.  Yes, it’s as basic as they come but it’s also an incredibly useful staple.  It has versions for both knit and woven fabric and, especially if you’re new to sewing, it walks you through the (very few) steps to create the skirt – sew side seams, sew on waistband, hem, DONE!  It really is that easy!  I made this skirt in way under an hour and still had time and fabric left to make a matching one for Margot.

The waistband is a fold-over yoga-style which means you can throw this baby on in a seconds flat…and it’s ridiculously comfortable!

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

The Fabric

If you’re going to make something as simple as this then it’s important to consider the fabric carefully.  A basic solid colour skirt would be acceptable but this techno-bright digital floral graphic is waaaay more fun, I think you’ll agree!

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

This is a heavy(ish) weight polyester/spandex jersey fabric.  The print is fun and vivid, the feel is slippery yet weighty and it’s listed on the Minerva Craft site as Scuba bodycon – which I found somewhat scary and slightly intimidating.  I had to double-check with Minerva to make sure it would be suitable for a simple skirt.

It turns out it’s perfect for this skirt.  I made view A but shortened it by 15 inches.  For Margot’s skirt I used the skirt part of the pattern from Kitschy Coo’s Skater Dress and drafted a waistband based on her measurements.  Again, easy as pie – and one happy girl!

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

One word to the wise, especially if using this fabric for children’s clothes, it will pick quite easily so, if such things bother you, take care.

I’ve crossed a line

This innocuous little project has also seen me cross a sewing line that I thought would never happen – matching mother/daughter clothes!  I cringe even when I type out the words!  What have I done!?

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

Well, if I’m totally honest I can’t say I’m that surprised.  Ever since I’ve seen Trine (Groovybaby…and Mama) sew up some fabulous ensembles for her and her daughter I knew that matching clothes could now officially be classed as cool and acceptable (at least in my world of what’s ‘official’ and what’s ‘cool’).  What about you?!  Are you rushing out to buy bolts of fabric destined for matching outfits or are you currently un-subscribing to this blog with the mere suggestion of such a fashion faux-pas?

Sum up

These things are true:

  • Summer is around the corner (at least for us Northern Hemispherers)
  • Time is always the most valuable commodity
  • Swishy skirts add fun and frivolity to life
  • If you have a daughter, you can now be twins!

Do you need any more persuading!  It’ll be the best 45 minutes you’ve ever spent sewing something so simple!

Simplicity 1616 // Behind the Hedgerow

Thanks for reading,

Laura x

PS – Have you noticed some changes around the blog?!  I have now moved from wordpress.com to wordpress.org!  Way-hey!  There will be more changes in the coming days and I’m working on my own little giveaway as well!  Stay tuned and in the meantime feel free to have a fresh look around.

 

Perfect Pattern Parcel #2 – Figgy’s Celestial Tee

 

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

Have you heard about the new and innovative way of selling modern sewing patterns?  It’s called Perfect Pattern Parcel and, in short, it’s a bundle of sewing patterns from independent designers that are available for a limited time on a semi-regular basis.  What makes it unique is the way they are sold – you choose the price you want to pay and how that money is divided between the organisers, the designers and a charity supporting children’s education.  You can read all about the initiative and purchase your parcel (available until 18th April) here.

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

This is the second bundle of patterns that’s been released and it’s centred around staples for a girl’s wardrobe.  It includes five patterns and really is a stylish and versatile collection – I can’t wait to sew them all.

Celestial Tee by Figgy’s

September Tunic and Dress by Too Sweets Patterns

The Caroline Party Dress by Mouse House Creations

Hanami Top and Dress by Straightgrain

Hosh Pants by LouBee Clothing

For this post I sewed a version of Figgy’s celestial tee.  I had a small amount of Liberty jersey leftover from this dress and I was determined to turn this into a tee.  I had to get a little creative with the pattern pieces to make it all work but, in the end, I’m happy with the look.

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

This pattern is a great staple and very easy to whip up (the sleeves are integrated so you don’t even have to fuss with setting them in).  I made a size 4/5 for my 6 year-old and you can see that it is a bit on the small side (but there is always something irresistible about little tummies poking out under shirts!).

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

My only other comment about this pattern is the method or attaching the neckline.  I’m used to dividing out the stretch of the neckline piece evenly around the whole tee before sewing.  Here Shelly instructs you to attach it without pinning and just stretch is gently as you sew.  This is by far the quickest method but you need to be careful about how much you stretch that neckline piece – too much and you’ll end up with a tiny, distorted neckline; too little and you’ll have a big gaping neck.  I did mine slightly too loose and actually pulled it all out and started again.

Figgy's Celestial Tee  Behind the Hedgerow

So there you have a quick, easy tee for the coming warmer months.  Everyone needs t-shirts, right?  You can even cut up some old adult sized t-shirts to make something new and wonderful for your little girl.  And let’s not forget that is it Kid’s Clothes Week so you really have no excuse to not get sewing!

Thanks for reading,

Laura x

An incredibly useful Autumn outfit

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the Hedgerow

I first mentioned the sewing of this outfit during Selfish Sewing Week way back at the end of September.  With such a lengthy delay I almost didn’t bother blogging about it at all, but I’ve been wearing these two pieces probably more than anything in my wardrobe and I couldn’t help but share.  For me and my style this outfit comes pretty close to perfection for an Autumn jaunt around town.

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the Hedgerow

Renfrew Top by Sewaholic

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the Hedgerow

This top has been on my bucket list since appearing in my Top 10 list in May.  I’ve put it off for a while because Sewaholic patterns are drafted for a pear-shaped figure, which I’m not, and was a little concerned about getting the fit right.  I finally crumbled – I just needed that cowl neck!

The Details

The Renfrew Top is a fitted knit top with banded hems (banded hems = no hemming of sleeves or bottom = no wavy hems!).  There are three variations that can be mixed and matched at will.

My version has a cowl neck (view C) with long sleeves (view A).  The fabric is bright red organic cotton jersey from Kitschy Coo.

I made a size 10.  My bust and waist measurements fit nicely in size 10 but my hips were size 4.  Why I didn’t grade down to size 4 on the hips, I don’t know?!  (But it all worked out in the end…keep reading 🙂 ).

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the Hedgerow

Construction

This really is an easy-peasy sew.  Scared of sewing with knits?  Don’t be!  The Renfrew is a great starting point.  A few things to remember:

  • Use a ball-point (jersey) needle.
  • Use a stretch stitch (to allow the fabric to stretch without breaking the stitches).  On my Brother machine it’s stitch 3 and looks like a lightning bolt.
  • Use a walking foot if you’re so inclined.  My feelings toward my walking foot run hot and cold.  I use it because I assume it keeps the layers of fabric lined up nicely but, in reality, I rarely notice a difference.  Also, it’s really loud and clunky to sew with.  Does anyone else find this?  I have a really cheap one that looks like this:

Anyone know if a better quality foot would make a significant difference?  Do I need to add one to my ever-growing Christmas list (along with a new camera, lenses, a serger, a dress dummy, some fantastic black leather ankle boots…I could go on).

The instructions for this top are expertly explained.  I’ve just pulled on them out to check the notes I made while sewing – but there are none.  In other words, there’s not much I can add to help you with construction – everything you need is in that little envelope!

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the Hedgerow

The Fit

Here’s where things get a little tricky.  When I tried on the top I was initially disappointed because it was too big around the hips (surprise, surprise, right?!) and was very, very unflattering.  Look at my saaaad face 🙁 .

Renfrew top (before shrinking to fit) // Behind the HedgerowBut then I washed it….and now I’m happy!Renfrew Top // Behind the Hedgerowdid pre-wash my fabric but that second wash gave it just the right about of shrinkage for a perfect fit!  It’s not often that shrinking a newly sewn garment is a good thing but I’ll take it!  **Note to self – and to you too – pre-wash jersey fabric twice before sewing.**

And look, this top is also great layered.  First with a cord blazer (this was the too-big-version)…

Renfrew Top // Behind the Hedgerow

And with my new Vogue jacket

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the Hedgerow

Simple Yoked Skirt from Simple Modern Sewing

renfrew top - yoked skirt - sewing bookSimple Modern Sewing is a lovely Japanese sewing book with 8 patterns that can be made into 25 different garments.  The styles are all simple and comfortable yet elegant.  The instructions are a little hit-and-miss but, for me, the extra work is worth the effort.

I made the Wrap Skirt earlier this year.  Which, in case you’re wondering is NOT, I repeat NOT a wraparound skirt….the cause of much head-scratching and frustration in its construction.

renfrew top - yoked skirt - sewing book wrap skirt picWrap Skirt // Behind the HedgerowThe Details

The yoked skirt is a slightly a-line skirt with, yup!, a yoke.  I pretty much lifted the whole look for this skirt from the book.

renfrew top - yoked skirt - sewing book skirt pic

I had this tweed-like fabric in my stash that I picked up in a remnant bin for €1.

selfish sewing sneak peak 4

Since I had already made the wrap skirt in size large (and the yoked skirt used the same pattern) I went for the lazy option and made size large….another sizing fail.

The Construction

This skirt was fairly straightforward in construction.  Of course the invisible zip can be problematic but I followed The Coletterie tutorial (as usual) which made the process painless.

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the HedgerowI also added a lining, which slowed things down a bit.  It was the first one I’d done with an invisible zip and it’s pretty messy on the inside around the zip.  I can live with that.

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the Hedgerow

The Fit

Oh, dear, another fitting failure!  This is how stupid I am.  I was so confident that the skirt would fit that I made the entire skirt – outside, lining, yoke, yoke facing, zip, all top-stitching – before I decided to try it on.  This is what I got:

Yoked Skirt // Behind the HedgerowAre you kidding?!?!  It was something like 4cm too big on either side!  Well, I put this baby down for a good few weeks.  In fact, I thought I would just abandon it altogether (or save for when I finally succumb to a life of sausages, Belgian frites, beer and macaroons).  I even surprised myself when I picked it up again and broke out the seam ripper.  I took in the requisite centimetres and sewed it all back up, trying to match the pattern on the lace as best as possible.  Now I have an awesome fit!  In fact, it fits better than almost anything I own (I’m learning, through sewing, that most of my clothes are actually a bit too big for me).

Renfrew Top and Yoked Skirt // Behind the Hedgerow

At the end of the day…

So, with a reasonable amount of effort and a nice dose of luck, I have an entirely functional and versatile outfit.  This makes me happy.  I would recommend both these patterns as good wardrobe-builders that don’t require too much specialist knowledge.

And, no sewing project is without its lessons learned:

  1. Try on your garment at every stage of the sewing process – not just at the end.
  2. Don’t give up!  You never know when the perfect garment is just around the corner.
  3. Simple, basic patterns are awesome.

Happy sewing to you all.  What have you been selfishly sewing for the season??  Or, have you been knee-deep in Christmas sewing?  Tell me all about it!

Thanks for reading,

Laura x

Fabric retail therapy – Wanna see what I got?

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So, I’m trying to write my first ever post from my phone and managed to publish the darn thing before I’d written a word!! Sorry…let’s start again, shall we?

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OMG – I’ve done it again!! Now I’m doubly sorry!!

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I just wanted to share with you all drool-worthy fabric. On my very brief visit to London I have managed to squeeze in a trip to Ray Stitch for a bit of retail therapy. Here are some pictures of my goodies – taken very unceremoniously on the bed of my hotel room.

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A lovely packaged bundle! Aren’t you just dying to see inside?!

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Let's start with some light reading material – I've flipped through Mollie Makes for about 5 seconds and already have 3 projects I want to try. First up is the sweet dolls on the cover – perfect for summer hand-stitching when getting in front of a sewing machine can be impossible.

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And here’s the rest of the loot.

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There are two great things about the above fabric. 1. It’s Liberty and 2. It’s jersey. Did you get that?!? Liberty jersey!! Love, love, love. I’m pretty sure this will be a Skater Dress from Kitchy Coo (sorry I’m not linking here – too difficult on phone!!).

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Next up is this gorgeous orange (have I mentioned how much I love orange?!) shot cotton. This picture doesn’t capture the true beauty of this fabric. Because there are two different colours woven in each direction, it has a lovely iridescent quality (that the iPhone can’t quite capture!). I’ll be making the Laelia blouse with this. What colour piping would you choose for the collar and yoke??

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And, not forgetting my sweet husband, I finally got my hands on Colette’s Negroni pattern.

Happy Friday to you all. I’m sorry for the shambolic state of this post – just eager to share!!

Thanks for reading,
Laura x

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And here’s a cute button. I’m done now, I promise!! x